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    • Aimee Mullins and her 12 pairs of legs (lecture)

      1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (12 votes, average: 3.92 out of 5)
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      Aimiee Mullins and her 12 pairs of legs is one of the greatest lectures I have seen. In a short 10 minutes she will inspire, motivate and captivate you with her new-age thinking toward prosthetics. She will make you smile with her sense of humour. This quote in particular had me laughing out loud. Joking aside, there’s a lot of truth in it.

      “From an identity standpoint, what does it mean to have a disability? Pamela Anderson has more prosthetic in her body than I do. Nobody calls her disabled.”

      Amiee had both of her legs amputated below the knee when she was an infant because she was born without fibula bones. Many of us would consider this a setback, a reason to avoid our dreams instead of chasing them, not Aimee. She not only learned to walk on prosthetics, she learned to run. Competing at the national and international level as a sprinter, setting records at the 1996 Paralympics in Atlanta.

      Her achievements don’t come close to ending there. After graduating from Georgetown where she double-majored in history and diplomacy, she ventured into modelling. By venturing, I mean participating in a high-profile runway show for Alexander McQueen. Tired yet, because she’s not. Aimee’s next adventure, acting. She appeared in the Matthew Barney’s Cremaster Cycle as the Leopard Queen.

      As a model, athlete, actress and activist, Aimee Mullin will change the way you perceive disabilities by transforming it into beauty with her 12 pairs of legs.

      please share:
      Published on April 2, 2010 · Filed under: Lifestyle, Society, Psychology
    • Romeo

      That was lovely. Thank you

    • Chloe

      How inspiring! If we can have voluptuous models, disabled models, we should be able to have short models too!