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    • Cassowaries

      1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (4 votes, average: 4.50 out of 5)
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      Cassowaries as you will discover in this documentary are one of the largest flightless bird and is not one to be reckoned with. With the average female weighing approximately 129 pounds and standing on average at 5.5 feet these birds are the size of humans. In fact if I were to stand next to an average female Cassowary I would be looking up at her as she would probably be taller.

      Lucky for me these powerful birds reside nowhere near me as they are usually found in the tropical rain forests in New Guinea. This species of bird has three different types, the most familiar being the emu and the ostrich. Their food of choice is mostly fruits, but they have also been known to eat small vertebrates and insects.

      Cassowaries takes the viewers on a tropical quest to save these endangered giant birds. The film reveals the birds fascinating natural history for the first time. The picture reveals that although Cassowaries are generally shy and withdrawn, they can cause hear, when disturbed. They can cause fatal injuries with their powerful legs, making them quite dangerous.

      Escape to the rain forest and into the world of a Cassowary in this captivating film.

      “This Documentary is Currently Not Available From the Director”

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      Published on April 9, 2009 · Filed under: Biology, Environment
    • eardowel

      That was really good. I had no idea what a cassowary was.
      I was impressed the the government acted so fast to meet their needs and relocate them.

    • Morte Cerebrale

      yeah, strange how they aren't particularly well known, and even inside Australia, not everyone knows about them. I grew up there, and I remember being maybe 10 years-old or so, and seeing one of these buggers, who at the time TOWERED over me, and my dad telling me in the back-ground "oh these can easily kill a man" (although he thought they head-butted their victims to death). It was behind a fence, but looking into it's little eyes I promise you, I was amazed, in awe, and very scared.

    • A Loving documentary, I wish all the best for the Cassowaries and hope they mass produce and populate this world and their territories to the fullest extent. They are such beautiful mamals and I would love to see them and visite them with my own eyes and my own touch. I would feed them as much as I could if I ever came across one. A awsome documentary, i loved it very much. I hope their doing good on their own. I wish them the best.