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    • Churchill’s Island

      1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (18 votes, average: 3.89 out of 5)
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      Churchill’s Island is a special documentary for a number of reasons. One being that it was the first Canadian film and documentary to win an oscar. Another interesting fact about the film is that it was produced by the National Film Board in 1941, during the World War II. This is unique has most documentaries about the war were made after it had ended.

      The 20-minute newsreel was part of two NFB film series, The World in Action and Canada Carries On. Churchill’s Island features captured enemy footage and firs-person interviews. These are both unique features as during that time period these were rarities for films. It’s focus was to bring the determination of a besieged England to a Canadian audience during that time.

      The narrator Lorne Greene delivers powerful messages throughout the film and imagery for the time is beyond impressive. For films during the time of Second World War, Churchill’s Island stands high above the rest. It brings Historiography to our eyes all these years later in an engaging and remarkable way.

      Until recently Churchill’s Island had been forgotten about and was literally disintegrating away in archives and vaults across North America. The NFB is in the process of restoring, preserving and digitizing the film for our viewing pleasure.


      Churchill’s Island documentary

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      Published on April 6, 2010 · Filed under: Biography, History, Politics
    • spacebunny

      Well, I have a lot of reactions to that.

      Film making has certainly come a long way, eh?

      I’ve been hesitating to watch this for over a week now. I had to steel myself to keep watching it. But I guess I’m glad I did because it provided insight into life back when Britain was a war machine.

      I veer away from new technology if I can get away with it. I’ve been accused of being Amish. Watching this suddenly made me realize that technological advancement is still a good thing. I don’t need a new cell phone every year but I certainly don’t want to get behind the times.

      Oh, and back to the war machine. That was a lot of ammunition, men, training, supplies, boats, planes–you name it. Here in the US, the federal government only recently passed healthcare legislation and by no means comprehensive. Why is war one of the only things that will really mobilize a country to do something worthwhile?