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    • First To Cross The Ocean

      1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (8 votes, average: 4.38 out of 5)
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      Who was the first to cross the ocean and how did they do it? A trek like that wouldn’t be an easy one. In this riveting documentary, the story surrounding mankind’s first major ocean crossing is chronicled. It was the first revolutionary arrival in Australia and holds many secrets. The secrets regarding why and how contemporary humans were able to dominate this planet and beyond.

      National Geographic takes the viewers on a wild water adventure in First to Cross the Ocean. Throughout the film, experts examine the many mysteries surrounding this groundbreaking historical voyage. When was it achieved? How exactly was the trip across the ocean achieved? What such a significant journey planned or was it achieved simply by mistake? What is it about modern-day humans that we are able to go where no man has been able to go before? This documentary attempts to answer these questions and many more.

      Throughout the documentary First to Cross the Ocean, several scientists from a variety of different specialties come together to examine the first pre-historic oceanic adventurers. The theory on the role of sexes in successfully developing new colonies is also addressed.

      If you can’t swim, grab your life jacket as we set sail on an adventure to discover the First to Cross the Ocean.

      “This Documentary is Currently Not Available From the Director”

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      Published on January 12, 2010 · Filed under: Anthropology
    • CBat

      Great topic, and well presented. However, they made a few conceptual leaps that seemed out-of place (or at least poorly explained).

    • Tyler

      Just when I was really getting into it Megashiteo cut me off. I'll have to finish this some other time. Good stuff.

    • Ramus

      I believe it is possible there was a land bridge between Indonesia and Australia which has since eroded due to the press of the Indian ocean and the Pacific. The Indo-Australian plate may also have been uplifted in the north due to the southern ice cap which was prevalent in southern Australia. Both scenarios do not require a sea voyage at all.

    • duderino

      But still, people must have made very long sea voyages (much longer than the one to get from Timor to Australia) in order to populate all of the Polinesian islands. Even if no sea voyage was needed to populate Australia, that is irrelevant to the fact that a huge leap must have been taken by ancient humans in order to populate the world.