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    • Tribal Displacement

      1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (17 votes, average: 3.06 out of 5)
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      Tribal Displacement touches on how indigenous cultures may eventually be extinct in fifty years, as a result of   the changes in the world, such as a shift in the eco-system, or  animal migration and climate change, or the changes in actual cultural beliefs. It delves on how tribes stand together to resist all these and remain solid in upholding age-old traditions.

      The film centers its focus on the tribe residing near the Godavari River in Andhra Pradesh, India, where the Polavaram Dam Project is being undertaken. The said project will be affecting some four hundred villages sitting in hectares upon hectares of land on the Dandakaranya forest.

      The large-scale project’s development is something that cannot be stopped at this point, in spite of a growing regional imbalance. In the past, projects like this don’t normally take into account the settelement and situation of of tribal communities, as well as other marginalized communities. And there lies the problem

      India, it seems need to find better ways to propel development, but still be environmentally sustainable and viable. It should find ways to consider the welfare of indigenous communities so that development will be a success for all sectors.

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      Published on May 20, 2010 · Filed under: Anthropology, Biology, Environment, Health, Psychology, Religion
    • T Funk

      …we don’t care about no government warning ’bout their promotion of the simple life and the dams they are building…

    • Jennifer

      The World Bank estimates that forcible “development-induced displacement and resettlement” now affects 10 million people per year. According to the World Bank an estimated 33 million people have been displaced by development projects such as dams, urban development and irrigation canals in India alone.

      India is well ahead in this respect. A country with as many as over 3600 large dams within its belt can never be the exceptional case regarding displacement. The number of development induced displacement is higher than the conflict induced displacement in India. According to Bogumil Terminski an estimated more than 10 million people have been displaced by development each year.

      Athough the exact number of development-induced displaced people (DIDPs) is difficult to know, estimates are that in the last decade 90–100 million people have been displaced by urban, irrigation and power projects alone, with the number of people displaced by urban development becoming greater than those displaced by large infrastructure projects (such as dams). DIDPs outnumber refugees, with the added problem that their plight is often more concealed.

      This is what experts have termed “development-induced displacement.” According to Michael Cernea, a World Bank analyst, the causes of development-induced displacement include water supply (dams, reservoirs, irrigation); urban infrastructure; transportation (roads, highways, canals); energy (mining, power plants, oil exploration and extraction, pipelines); agricultural expansion; parks and forest reserves; and population redistribution schemes.